Quevedo (Twayne's World Authors Series, TWAS 153: Spain)

Donald W. Bleznick


TWAYNE'S WORLD AUTHORS SERIES (TWAS)

The purpose of TWAS is to survey the major writers—novelists, dramatists, historians, poets, philosophers, and critics—of the nations of the world. Among the national literatures covered are those of Australia, Canada, China, Eastern Europe, France, Germany, Greece, India, Italy, Japan, Latin America, New Zealand, Poland, Russia, Scandinavia, Spain, and the African nations, as well as Hebrew, Yiddish, and Latin Classical literatures. This survey is complemented by Twaynes United States Authors Series and English Authors Series.

The intent of each volume in these series is to present a critical-analytical study of the works of the writer; to include biographical and historical material that may be necessary for understanding, appreciation, and critical appraisal of the writer and to present all material in clear, concise English—but not to vitiate the scholarly content of the work by doing so.

Francisco de Quevedo (1580-1645) is undeniably one of the greatest Spanish writers that ever lived. He wrote during the Baroque period, a time in which Spanish literature reached its pinnacle of efflorescence. It is ironical that this same era manifested a progressive deterioration of Spain's political and economic power. This decline of a formidable empire built by Charles V and Philip II in the sixteenth century was accompanied by bitter disillusion and futile attempts to comprehend and remedy the causes. No other Golden Age writer, with the possible exception of Cervantes, reveals so profound a grasp of the ideals and mores of the Spanish people.

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